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Last Update: Tuesday December 10, 2019

Key Idea: Pay Attention to Details

Hope LanCarte grew up within her family's business. She has been part of the growth of every element of their Miracle on Commerce Street.

Key Question:

A: 

Everything counts. You saw Hope observing one of her employees perfectly handling the preparation of Joe T's famous chilli rellenos.

Q:
Can we ever relax?

A: No. We have to install processes and systems to insure attention to detail. Every stage of the supply chain at Joe T's is full of details and Hope has a sharp eye to note when employees are doing it all right and when she needs to step in with some coaching.

John Solheim, owner of Ping Golf, says that they achieve perfection because they have no quality control department. Every single employee is in charge of quality when the product is in their hands. This makes so much sense that we wonder why everyone doesn't embrace this idea.

Q: What happens to the corporate culture when everyone is responsible for the details?

A:  At first you might think that if no one is in charge of quality then quality suffers but the opposite is true. A Ping, because every person in the process has the power to stop a golf club and send it back, then everyone is on their toes.

Employees take personal pride in the fact that a golf club will not leave their hands unless it meets the high standards that Ping has become known for in the market place. The entire company is infused with pride and this translates into increased productivity. Making everyone in charge of quality is also a team building strategy. If there was a quality control position, the person with that job might be seen as the cop on the beat who is looking for employees to make mistakes. Employees might even see this person as the enemy, and therefore quality becomes a bad thing not a good thing!

Think about it

What can you do to improve the results you achieve now? How can you turn every employee into a quality control person?

Clip from: Joe T. Garcia's, a family restaurant

Fort Worth: Recognized by the James Beard Foundation for their outstanding regional cuisine, this family restaurant is truly a celebrated landmark in the USA.

Hope LanCarte is a first-generation American and the matriarch of a family business that her father began in 1935. Within three generations, this place has become a celebrated landmark, paradise on earth, "The Miracle on Commerce Stre.et."  Hope's father came from Mexico with nothing. And today, this family has everything.

What happens when a family works together, pulls together, and stays together for three generations? Impossible? In this episode of the show we find proof positive that it is possible. When a family coheres and works toward a common goal, miracles happen.

Joe T. Garcia's Mexican Restaurant

Jody LanCarte, Public Relations

2201 N Commerce St
Fort Worth, TX 76164 ‎ , TX 76164 ‎

Visit our web site: http://joets.com

Business Classification:
Restaurant

Year Founded: 1939

Pay Attention to Details

HATTIE: What do you think they're doing right?

CURTIS FRAZIER: Oh, I think that the enthusiasm of all the family for the business is the big attraction out here because people get to know all the kids and look forward to seeing them.
 
HATTIE: (Voiceover) Joe T. Garcia started the business by serving up barbecue. Then his wife added the family recipes she brought from Mexico. Today their daughter, Hope Garcia LanCarte, oversees the business and the authentic Mexican home cooking people keep coming back for. Well, what's the secret? So this is the chili rellenos.

HOPE LANCARTE: Really, the big secret is what she's doing right now; this right here, the eggs, in order...

HATTIE: The batter.

HOPE: The batter -- in order for it to puff up like it should.

HATTIE: (Voiceover) Inside every great business you will find close attention paid to hundreds of details. You'll find that attention in abundance here at Joe T.'s. And the chili rellenos -- how do you prepare it to this point?

HOPE: The chili, we put it over the grill and let it toast, and then we peel the top part off. And then after that we cut it and we take out all the seeds and then you either stuff it with chicken or cheese or the picadillo. Of course, we use the real tenderloin in there. We don't use the picadillo.

HATTIE: Now is this your father's recipe, your mother's...

HOPE: My mother's recipe.

HATTIE: Your mother's recipe. And you believe she brought all these from Mexico. HOPE: Oh, I know she did.

HATTIE: So this has nothing to do with Texas.

HOPE: No. No. But so many people say Tex-Mex.

HATTIE: But it's Mexican.

HOPE: But, really, this is from her town in Mexico. And that's the way her mother did it. Well, Mother started a little place in the back part of the grocery store. And she would serve sandwiches to the packing-house workers, and then that's how, I think, they got the idea of putting in a little restaurant.

 
 

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