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Last Update: Wednesday September 20, 2017

Key Idea: Reward Commitment

Long-term employees embody your corporate culture and provide institutional memory.

Key Question:

A: 

Don has employees who have been at Record Technology for more than two decades.
He pays them well and he treats them with admiration and respect.  He treats them as equals.  He makes them feel valuable and even indispensable.

Q:  Does this fit with Don's mission to be the best in the world?

A:  Yes.  Being the best in the world is a long-term goal and that requires continuity. 

Think about it

How do you reward continuity?  Are the people you have had for a long time the most revered and respected?  If not, why not?  If you can't champion a person who has been with you for years, is it time to let that person go?  Can you see the team you have now on your payroll ten years from now?

Clip from: Record Technology

Camarillo, California: Meet Melody and Don MacInnis; they're  "making it in America."   They manufacturer and export to the far corners of the world because they are now known as the best  record manufacturers -  vinyl, phonograph, long-playing records -- on earth.  Most kids today do not even know what what a vinyl LP record is.  Most think it is a dead technology.  But talk to any audiophile, and  you'll hear them wax euphorically about the fullness of the analog quality of the sound.

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Record Technology, Inc.

Don & Melody MacInnis, Owners

486 Dawson Drive
Camarillo, CA 93012

Visit our web site: http://www.recordtech.com

Business Classification:
Manufacturing

Year Founded: 1992

Reward Commitment

(Voiceover) It is art as much as science. If your lacquer, plating facility or raw materials have flaws, the LP won't be right. Record Technology has invested in the best equipment and perfected the processes, but it takes these people to add the art.

DON: Ray Kashimoto, our plant manager, has been manufacturing phonograph records for about 25 years.

RAY KASHIMOTO (Plant Manger, Record Technologies): And let's see, every machine, every part along the way, every little thing has to be perfect. And if it isn't, then you're going to struggle.

HATTIE: Your customers tell you.

RAY: We know it. They--yeah, we know it.

GARY SOLSTRUM (Department Head, Record Technologies): We care very deeply. I personally do, and the people I work with, care about the music, and that's why I'm here.

DON: (Voiceover) Gary Solstrum--he's probably the most serious audiophile here in our facility. Gary's been doing what he does for almost 20 years and has a lot of pride in what he does and a lot of knowledge.

HATTIE: OK. What is that sound? Can you describe the difference in a CD and a vinyl album?

GARY: Well, to me, it's more like witnessing John Coltrane.

HATTIE: So go ahead and say it, Gary, it's better than sex.

GARY: Oh, no! It depends on who you're listening to.

HATTIE: I thought I could get somebody to say it's better than sex.

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